Enemas

One of these ‘love it or leave it’ subjects when it comes to erotic power exchanges. Still, something you should know about and understand before even thinking about using them. So here is most of the basic info. However – as always – be aware of the following: everything below is information, not individual or general medical advice. Individual situations may be different from the average. When in doubt, always consult your doctor.

Why do we use enemas?

To start with, enemas are used for different purposes – to clean out before entering, as a punishment, as a form of training, as a humiliation, an extra “incentive” to bondage or for plain (sexual) enjoyment. No matter what purpose, one objective is common: making your partner refrain from expelling the content of their bowels.

Some general issues

In principle – and of course when done with proper care and knowledge – enemas as such are not dangerous; however, there are some dangers. As always, you must be careful when you’re interfering with any of the body’s routines. Cautions exist for people with heart diseases, lung-related diseases (asthma and such), diabetics, people with epilepsy, any woman during or just after pregnancy and in general for people who are not feeling well. In this case all stomach, intestinal and metabolism related diseases should be added to this list as well of course. Also, enemas may have a devastating impact on people with an alcohol or drug addiction.

“Optimistic” quantities of fluid used and a high frequency of use may also cause all sorts of problems, the most important one being the fact that the bacteria in the intestines and the muscles around them may “get lazy” and the metabolism may become less effective. Keep your quantity and frequency reasonable.

Kinds of enemas

In general there are two different enemas: the ones based on filling the bowels with fluid and the “chemical” ones that you can buy over the counter in your local drugstore or pharmacy. The latter just bring out the content quickly; the former – especially when used several times during one session – really clean and therefore are the favorite for use. The “chemical” enema is a lot more difficult to hold and you probably will have only three to five minutes before the designated process starts and cannot be stopped again.

Fluid quantities

When it comes to the quantities of fluid: anything between half a liter and a liter (1/8 to 1/4 of a gallon) is safe, depending on the size of the body; however, especially for those just starting out – or if you are planning more than one enema in a session – a mug full is more than enough.

Some fringe benefits of enemas

When administered with knowledge and care, a few water-only enemas in one day will boost the cleaning capabilities of your body. Most of the water is absorbed and works in the same way drinking water does, only faster. This is generally a good thing, particularly since most people don’t drink enough water to start with.
Pro Tip If you add some glucose to your second enema (after the first one to deal with the big “clean out”) you will “feed” your partner automatically and give them enough extra energy to deal with the entire session.

Administering an enema

You need three things: a bag, a tube and a nozzle. The nozzle is what goes inside the rectum; NOTHING ELSE. To administer an enema, best go by a step-by-step routine.

Step 1
In various settings (such as when the enema is used in “nursing games” or as a punishment or form of training, the sight of the bag being filled forms an important part of the session as such – “the promise” of what is going to go inside soon, the fear, often is an essential element. If the enema is not part of the game but a preparation for something else, like a anal session, you may want to go about this differently, in a more casual, efficient way. Either way, fill the bag and use a medical clamp on the tube to hold the fluid in.
Step 2
If you haven’t done so before, thoroughly clean the nozzle by washing it with hot water and anti-bacterial soap – rinse with lots of clean water afterwards to get rid of any soap residue. Next, connect the nozzle to the tube (or the tube and nozzle to the bag if nozzle and tube form one piece) and make sure the connection is properly sealed, will not leak and will not come off easily. Now make sure there is no air in the bag.
Step 3
Put on your latex gloves and rub the prepared nozzle (now connected to the tube) and your partner’s anus with LOTS of lubricant to facilitate the receiving of the nozzle and prevent accidental injuries – let a bit of fluid run through the tube and nozzle to remove all air – and SLOWLY insert the nozzle into the anus. Never insert the entire nozzle, but leave enough of it out to be able to remove it again without any trouble. Note: Keep the bag at the same level as the nozzle to prevent an early start of the flow.
Step 4
Keep the bag at the same level as the nozzle and unclamp the tube or open the tab (depending on your type of bag). Now SLOWLY lift the bag a little to start the fluid moving inward. You need to be careful here. You want the fluid to go in slowly and with as little pressure as possible. Only lift the bag higher if more pressure is required (i.e. as the fluid stops flowing). Very slowly raise it bit by bit until the bag is completely empty.
Step 5
Remove the nozzle and (especially for novices) best replace it with a (previously lubricated) butt plug.
Step 6
Now it all depends on what you’re planning. Have your partner sit and wait if this is a cleaning operation – if this is training or punishment you may want to wait for the first cramps to start. Especially if your partner is new to this, make sure you give them sufficient mental support and encouragement.

Health Hint: Make sure your partner drinks water or a gatorade type liquid after one or more enemas to avoid dehydration. And, if you’re not using the “feeding technique” (see above and the next article), make sure they eat something as well. Glucose, sugar, sweets, chocolate or dextrose are the best ideas.

Solutions

When we are talking about fluid-based enemas, “solutions” are THE topic. If you’re inexperienced, start with using lukewarm (hand warm) milk or a mixture of half milk/half water. Plain (lukewarm) water is a good idea too, although less effective. The most effective solution is soapy water and the pro will add glycerin (50/50 soap/glycerin – about one teaspoon of each will do nicely) to the second and next enema which will both boost the effect and protect the intestines.

Soaps

Ivory bar soap works well. Just let the water flow over the soap bar when filling the bag and you’ll have enough soap. A few drops of glycerine, vegetable oil and/or a bit of camomile will improve the effects. For a stronger soapy solution, use a container and swish the water around to dissolve more soap.  Standard packet is 2/3 oz of soap. Instructions on packet usually say something like: “Dilute contents of packet with 1 or 2 quarts of lukewarm water” … but for our purposes about half that strength usually is more than enough. Adding a few drops of peppermint oil (do NOT use Eucalyptus oil for this) will have a cooling – surprising – effect. It is a good idea to always end with a plain water enema to deal with any possible soap residue.

Non-soap solutions

Plain tap water can be used, but be warned that the colon will absorb quite a bit of the water, which will dilute the blood electrolytes. Then the various tissues of the body absorb the excess water and swell. Your brain swells, too, and there isn’t any place for it to expand into. This is called cerebral edema. A few 2 quart plain water enemas won’t do any harm (in fact will have a positive effect as described above), but if you plan to use large or many enemas, use salt water.

  • Salt Water enema (Saline Enema) is just warm water with one tablespoon of salt to the quart. The salt is used to prevent absorption of the water by the colon.
  • Baking soda enema (which can also have salt added as above) has one or two tablespoons of baking soda dissolved in each quart of water.
  • Beer (usually warm) can be used. It is pretty irritating and – obviously – at least one of you will get drunk.
  • Oil Retention enema is an injection of about 4-8 fl. oz. of mineral oil, vegetable oil or olive oil. It is held in the colon for an hour or more before a soapy water enema is given. The soapy water enema can be very strong because the oil will protect the colon from irritation. The oil coats the lining of the colon, and also softens the bowel contents, making for a spectacularly powerful evacuation. When the oil is in the colon, do not be fooled by what feels like the urge to expel gas. If you do, you will expel a blast of dirty oil with it, and it will be a mess. If you absolutely must pass the gas, get into the knee-chest position (see below) for one minute, and then hold a piece of toilet paper over the anus, to prevent the release of the oil. Do not expel the oil before taking the soapy water enema. You will need to take at least three soapy enemas to remove all trace of the oil, or dirty oil will leak out of the anus for about 12 hours.
    Urine is sometimes used. It can be used safely provided the person donating the urine is disease free and the general advice is to use water-diluted urine.  

Temperature

Most people find that a warm water enema can be held more easily than a cold one. Here’s some information on ranges of temperatures:

  • Cool water is 86 – 95 degrees F – this is lukewarm and the most frequently used temperature that most people are comfortable with.
  • Warm water is 104 – 108 degrees F – slightly warmer and as such, more effective if you want something more difficult to hold.
  • Hot water is 110 – 113 degrees F – the “pro” temperature – still safe to use provided it is followed by one or two cooler ones.
  • Don’t use solutions over 113 F or you can scald the colon.

Anatomy of the colon

The anus (a muscular ring) is the external sphincter which closes off the rectum from the outside of the body. It can easily stretch to about 1 inch diameter, and – with care – can be stretched wider.                                                                                                                                         

The rectum is a powerful muscular organ about 5 inches long, with a sphincter at each end.

The sigmoid colon is a looped section of the bowel just above the rectum. Its shape resembles a question mark; the loop occurs at about a depth of ten inches. The size of the sigmoid is different for different people. There is the long sigmoid and the short sigmoid, and a few people are born with one in between. Those who have the big sigmoid can take about a full quart of water more than those with the short one.

The descending colon is on the left side of the lower abdomen, and can easily be felt any time the abdominal muscles are fully relaxed. It hugs the left wall of the pelvis, and reaches up to the splenic flexure, which is just under the left rib cage.

The transverse colon extends from the splenic flexure to the hepatic flexure, right across the abdomen on the right. It follows a sagging course across, and in many people sags about 3/4 of the way down in the middle.

The ascending colon is on the right side of the pelvis, and the lowest part of it is called the cecum; the part of the colon where the small intestine expels its contents in a liquid form. It is the part of the colon with the largest diameter, and is most effective in absorbing water.

After taking a large enema, stand in front of a mirror, with the light from a ceiling lamp falling across the abdomen, and the shadows will make many of these structures readily apparent. The transverse should show up as a shadow about 2-3 inches below the belly button. When lying face down on a bed, the cecum will expand to an enormous size, then lift the body a few inches with the hands and knees and the right side of the belly will clearly show the shape and position of this part of the colon.

The colon narrows gradually from the cecum (about 2-1/2 to 3 inches when distended) to the sigmoid, about 1 to 1-1/4 inches diameter.

Positions

There are many positions in which an enema can be taken. Two of the most widely known are the “Sims” position and the “Knee-Chest” position. The “Sims” position – the position generally advised to nurses – has the recipient lying on the left side, with the right knee brought up near the chest.

The “Knee-Chest” position has the recipient in a kneeling position, supported by the knees and the shoulders, with the chest sagging down, so that the chest almost touches the floor. This places the abdomen nearly upside down, so that the water can flow down from the rectum to the transverse colon by gravity. In hospitals this position is sometimes used as an alternative to the “high enema” (a “high enema” is something you should NOT try and administer yourself unless you’re a trained nurse – the “Knee-Chest” position is the safe alternative) in cases of deep-seated constipation, this position will help the water reach way up into the colon for a good cleaning out.

Tip: It is also useful as a technique for floating air or gas in the colon above the water so that the air can be expelled.
Standing upright requires you to hold the tube in the anus unless you use a nozzle that can be held in, but it makes it possible to accept more water than any other position.

Lying on the back is a favorite position, especially for the first enema of a session. In this position the recipient can watch the bag slowly deflate, and can also watch the abdomen expand as the water enters the colon. The best is to lie down so that you can prop your head against a wall, like a pillow. Raising the knees increases the comfort in this position.

Lying face down can be used, but pressing the belly on the floor restricts the abdomen’s need to expand. Lying face down and arching the back by raising the upper body on the elbows is a very stimulating position, and lifts the belly up from the floor. This presses the genital area against the floor, and leaves the breasts and nipples free for other stimulation.

Lying on the right side is the opposite of the “Sims” position, and causes the water to flow down into the cecum. When you do this, feel the ballooning out of the cecum, the part of the colon with the largest diameter.
Sitting on the floor allows a person to tense certain skeletal muscles, and can lead to a powerful orgasm. The floor helps hold the nozzle in. This may not be the greatest position for filling and cleaning the bowel, however. Reclining is similar to sitting, but you lean back against something.

Reclining in the bathtub is quite comfortable, except that the tub may be cold. You don’t have to worry about leakage here. Leaning over the edge of the bathtub is similar to getting on your hands and knees, but it leaves your hands and arms free, and is a little easier to stay in that position for a while. Sitting on the edge of the bathtub is comfortable, and is the way to do a faucet enema.

A FIRM “DO NOT” – Never ever try administering an enema to someone who is positioned or suspended upside down. Apart from the fact that expelling will cause all sorts of problems, this position is both extremely painful and dangerous. For good reasons this method was used as one of the most effective torture technique in the Middle Ages. Filling the intestines with water in this position causes extreme pressure on some of the more tender organs such as the liver, kidneys and stomach, which is where the pain, the almost instantaneous nausea AND the damage comes from. This method was (and in some countries still is) frequently used for torture since the method does not leave any external markings, hence there is no obvious external evidence of torture.
 Combining it with a water-filled stomach, leaves the victim almost without the ability to breath as well (the combination of both methods was known as the “Water Torture” during the Middle Ages).

Capacity

Every individual has his or her own capacity, and it will change from each enema to the next. The cleanliness of the colon and the amount of gas present will have a great effect on the volume of water that can be taken. Medical researchers have determined that the average adult human colon has a capacity of 7 quarts. However, this measurement has been made using colons removed from cadavers, who wouldn’t complain about the pressure. You may want to experiment with this by taking the largest enema that is comfortable, and then rolling from side to side very slowly and seeing if the water runs downhill to distend the lower side more. You probably will find that the lower part of the colon will be noticeably more swollen, indicating that it is your abdomen that is unable to expand to allow the colon to accept any more fluid.

The general advice, however, is not to exceed the quantities mentioned here. As always, it’s not a contest and you’re not setting out to break the world record on holding fluid in your intestines.

Retention

Most people will find it difficult to retain an enema for more than five minutes. If the bowel is not clean, then the peristaltic action of the colon will push against the fecal masses and produce intense pressure. This will frequently happen with the first enema in a series. If you are planning more sessions, you may try a “chemical” enema first to cope with this and change the method for the next session(s).

If your get a strong cramp and an urge to expel, getting up is the worst thing to do. Making the descending colon vertical adds gravity to the force pushing out. This is how to have an accident. If you can, wait while lying down. The pressure will pass in 10-15 seconds as the wave of peristalsis passes the sigmoid colon and reaches the end. Then get up and expel without straining to hold it in.

Whenever the pressure is building, or you can feel a big bulge with your hands, massage around that area until the pressure relaxes. Some people recommend rolling from one side to the other every minute or so. The idea is that the water will flow repeatedly downhill, alternately filling the descending and sigmoid colon and then running down to the cecum. This is supposed to break up any masses in the transverse. A butt plug is a great tool to help (or force) to hold the water in but will not completely stop any expulsion. Make sure the plug you use is not too big – the power of the expulsion may be big enough to push the plug out and that may cause damage. So always make sure the plug can be pushed out with relative ease.

Expulsion

Obviously, most people expel their enemas while seated on the toilet. This is probably not the best position for expelling water from the colon because of the need for the wide cecum to push the water up hill to the transverse, and then for the transverse to pump it back up its sag to get it to the descending. A large volume in the descending will cause the descending colon to slide down the left side and kink where it meets the sigmoid. This can get you stuck! If you can feel lots of water bulging on the left side, but can’t get it out, you need to change positions. Get up and lie down for a moment, or get into the knee-chest position, or just turn around as if you’re looking over your shoulders. These techniques can un-kink the descending, and get the water passing out again.

Some people prefer to expel in the bathtub, which is much easier, because the colon does not need to lift water to get it out. This is extremely messy, however, so don’t do it unless you don’t mind cleaning up. If the colon becomes severely blocked while holding an enema, you may prefer to do this rather than call the paramedics. In the hospital, patients are usually given a bedpan when expelling enemas, to get the same benefit of the position, so this is a technique you may turn to as well because it allows for maximum comfort and saves the trouble of having to run to the bathroom. Especially in combination with bondage or restraints the use of a bedpan is a must since you may not always have the time to free someone (or get free) in time.

If there is substantial gas in the colon, it may be very difficult for the colon to lift water when large air bubbles are present. These like to collect at the hepatic flexure, high on the right side, and can be detected by a rumbling sound when you press there. If you want to get the gas out, sit on the floor and make sure the gas is at the hepatic. Roll slowly onto the right side, then massage the transverse, following its course with your hands. You will know that you’re moving that gas by the rumbling. When you have the gas moved to the splenic flexure, move quickly to the knee-chest position. Now massage the descending colon upward, from the ribs to the groin on the left side (you’re “upside down”, remember) until the gas has moved to the sigmoid. Use heavy massage in the groin area, to move water out of the sigmoid, and move the gas in. When this is done, get on the toilet quickly, and it should be possible to expel a prodigious gas blast. You may have to repeat this procedure several times, but when all the gas is out of the colon you should be able to expel the water quickly.

Don’t sit on the toilet for more than a few minutes if there’s no water coming out. Sitting too long and straining are the chief causes of hemorrhoids. Those will certainly ruin your enema pleasure. If nothing is coming out, lie down either face down or up, or lie on your left side, or get into the knee-chest position. These will help the water move, and soon you can go back to the pot.

Equipment

Standard safety advice for doing this with others: wear latex gloves at all times during an enema session and have a good quantity available so you can change gloves every time they get dirty. In general, you can never have enough of them. Since they are cheap this is an investment you don’t have to worry about. The other thing to invest in is lubricant; lots of it. Buy water-based lubricant so your latex gloves and other latex or rubber equipment will not be damaged and buy a dispenser instead of the little sachets or tubes. Easier to handle, especially if larger amounts of lubricant are needed — and they always are with ANY form of anal play.

If you’re planning to do any enema play outside the bathroom – as in bed or in your dungeon – buy a large quantity of plastic and cover the bed, bondage table, floor or whatever with LARGE quantities of it because there is a serious risk things may become messy. Even trained enema users can never exactly predict how long they can hold the enema and the expulsion may come instantly. For this reason: never run for the toilet if you feels the expulsion starting. Usually you won’t make it. Instead expel on the plastic — it’s easy to fold and remove instantly afterwards (and seriously, all other attempts will probably fail).

Enema bags and tubes

The standard enema apparatus available in the drugstore can be divided into several types. There is the open-top fountain syringe, usable for enemas and douches. There is the closed-top type bag, which can also be used as a hot-water bottle. There is the four-way type, which also is intended to be used as an ice bag. Most of these units offer 2 quart capacity. If that is the limit of your capacity, the open-top fountain syringe is the best type to use, because it is very convenient. The enema and douche nozzles that come with these units leave much to be desired however. There are also discreet type units sold primarily for feminine hygiene use, but some come with enema tips also.

Another brand/type is the “Shy” – an expandable syringe which is filled by pressing the mouth of the bag against the sink faucet. This bag will hold 4 quarts. The big drawback is that it has no way to shut off the flow except to remove the bag from the tube, which will cause the water to flow from the rectum. What you need to do is to attach a hose with a clamp to the nozzle, which is inserted into the bag. You can pour liquid soap into the bag before filling with water.

Even though there is some information around on building your own equipment the general advice is NOT to do that. Pressure is everything when it comes to enemas. The pressure comes from the influx of the fluid and too much pressure is painful and dangerous, hence the combination of bag, tube, nozzle and position is paramount and is best left to the professional producers of this equipment.

There are small rubber ball type pumps around, used for children in hospitals. Do not buy these. The risks of pumping air into the colon or building up too much pressure are too high and the quantity is not enough for an adult anyway so you would need to pump in fluid several times, thus only increasing the risks. The same goes for – very antique – enema pumps. Don’t use them, but they may be nice to add some atmosphere, especially for those into “nursing” games. Oh, and another DON’T – never ever try anything that is directly connected to a water tap (like the shower or a hose). There is no way you can control the quantity of fluid, the temperature and the pressure this way. Also, forget about any plans to use a funnel.

Nozzles and tubes

There are many different types of nozzles and tubes available for inserting into the rectum. What you want is either a colon tube (a rubber tube from 1/4″ to 1/2″ diameter and anywhere from 10″ to 3 feet long) or a nozzle with a bulb on the end, to help hold it in. These are called “N-Tips”. Some of the best drug stores carry these items, but usually you’ll have to ask for them. Some drug stores also carry the fleet high-volume bag enema or an equivalent brand, these are made of plastic and will not deteriorate when oils are used, as a rubber bag will. The “high-volume bag” usually holds 2500 CC (over 2 quarts) but in the same series, the manufacturers make a barium enema container which can be ordered, and it has 3500 cc capacity (almost 4 quarts). Medical stores carry many of these items. These are considered disposable, but with a little care they will last a long time.
The Colon Tube is a straight tube with a rounded end, and usually a small hole in the side near the tip. They come in many sizes, and are usually measured in “French” sizes. 28 French is a small tube, and 36 are fairly large.

The N-Tip is really made to help patients hold a barium enema (not for use at home – barium enemas are used as “contrast fluid” during X-ray photography in hospitals), but many people use them for other enemas. It’s made of molded plastic.

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